Saturday, July 24, 2010

Dizziness Handicap Inventory

Most practices that evaluate substantial numbers of dizzy patients use questionnaires to quantify symptoms. One of the most commonly used "standardized questionnaires" is the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Developed by Jacobson & Newman, 1990. There are 25 questions requiring one of three responses: Yes, Sometimes, No. Yes=4. Sometimes=2. No=0.

Does looking up increase your problem? Yes
Because of your problem, do you feel frustrated? No
Because of your problem, do you restrict your travel for business or recreation? No
Does walking down the aisle of a supermarket increase your problem? Yes
Because of your problem, do you have difficulty getting into or out of bed? Sometimes
Does your problem significantly restrict your participation in social activities such as going out to dinner,going to movies, dancing, or to parties? No
Because of your problem, do you have difficulty reading? Yes
Does performing more ambitious activities like sports, dancing, household chores such as sweeping or putting dishes away increase your problem? Yes
Because of your problem, are you afraid to leave your home without having some one accompany you? No
Because of your problem, have you been embarrassed in front of others? No
Do quick movements of your head increase your problem? Yes
Because of your problem, do you avoid heights? No
Does turning over in bed increase your problem? No
Because of your problem, is it difficult for you to do strenuous housework or yardwork? Yes
Because of your problem, are you afraid people may think you are intoxicated? No
Because of your problem, is it difficult for you to walk by yourself? Yes
Does walking down a sidewalk increase your problem? Yes
Because of your problem, is it difficult for you to concentrate? Yes
Because of your problem, is it difficult for you to walk around your house in the dark? Yes
Because of your problem, are you afraid to stay home alone? No
Because of your problem, do you feel handicapped? No
Has your problem placed stress on your relationships with members of your family or friends? No
Because of your problem, are you depressed? No
Does your problem interfere with your job or household responsibilities? Yes
Does bending over increase your problem? Yes

My response is alongside. Hah! This time I scored 50, whereas the one I returned to Dr Chen I had only scored 40. I think I changed the response to getting out of bed, and problem with heights. I have mainly a physical aspect to my experience with this problem rather than a psychological response. I am figuring that will come with time.

7 comments:

diane said...

I feel sorry for you. it sounds similar to how I feel when I get vertigo. But I would have to put YES to turning over in bed. Is this likely to get worse or remain as ir is?

Julie said...

I do not have any of the rolling-over aspect. No need to feel sorry to any great extent. I dont feel sorry for me. It just is something which 'is'. I am not in any pain. I am not depressed. And I am learning to cope.

It is likely to get worse. It will get worse. However, my attitude will define it. I can learn to cope and the impact will be less.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Household chores such as sweeping or putting dishes away increase your problem? Yes
Difficult for you to do strenuous housework or yardwork? Yes
Interfere with your household responsibilities? Yes

mmm I think I've get an attitude problem :-)

altadenahiker said...

So, they intersperse the physical with the emotional questions. That's what annoys me about almost any inventory (over here, I think they call them "instruments" -- ugh) such as this, because I think they think they're being subtle.

Julie said...

The thing that irritates me most is something like the queston "... are you afraid people might think you are intoxicated'. My son SAID that I walk as though I were intoxicated. But 'afraid'? Not afraid, not even worried. If I smelt of beer, wobbled and had greasy hair THEN people might think I was intoxicated. It does not worry me if people think I am intoxicated because I know I am not. So, what's to worry?

ChrisJ said...

I find all your posts on this subject of great interest because I have similar problems and I'm not getting much help. I have depth perception problems. I have double vision (I was told just to shut one eye when trying to read street signs!) I have vertigo -- the last episode to the point of vomiting. I stumble when I walk. The intoxication thing has passed through my mind, but I don't drink. I feel very insecure walking up and down steps. I also have neuropathy and fibromyalgia. It all sounds so awful, but there is no pain, just inconvenience and a growing insecurity. I worry a bit about driving, but I daren't tell anyone THAT! I've had a battery of tests done through a neurologist,with no definite results. I can live with it, but I'd certainly like to know what causes it all. I'm 72 and always been very capable and in control of my life. (I was a high school principal before retiring).

Julie said...

I dont have classic vertigo nor do I have fibromyalgia, Chris. However, I have been having this investigated for over 10 years now, and only had a reasonable diagnosis last December.I have double vision, depth perception issues, and walk around with one eye closed (left one) much of the time.

I knew I had problems with driving and that was an obvious decision to make. Massive impact, but no choice.

The medical system in the US is quite different from in Australia. I think ours is very efficient and very effective. It is very much like the National Health in the UK.

Although it is good to have the diagnosis, there is nothing they can do. Well there is medication, but the side effects are worse than the problem. And there is some form of surgery where the nerves are severed.

I am adamantly against them both.

My self-treatment is to push myself. Eat well. Sleep well. Keep involved, both physically and mentally. And never ever never feel sorry for myself.