Saturday, December 20, 2008

McDiarmid's noble thistle

It is a stretch to call a thistle beautiful: rather, it is handsome. It has character beneath the prickle. The seed is encased in the involucre from the top of which sprouts the mauve flower petals. Once the involucre shrivels, it splits to release the most delicate of thistledown: the seed with its own propelling system that ensures that is spreads on the slightest of zephyrs to an nearby rocky patch to continue the genus.
A thistle growing on the slopes above St Andre-de-Roquepertuis in the Langedoc, France in October this year.
A thistle growing beside the ploughed field, Freeman's Waterhole in New South Wales, Australia in December this year.

8 comments:

Per Stromsjo said...

Lots of character, for sure. Good to have some colours to look at as we're in the midst of a snowless winter.

Virginia said...

Your season is blooming, good. We can enjoy. I left a message from a day or so ago. I value your answer.
V

Virginia said...

Just another stop to say we go the last week in May and the first 3 weeks in June. Three in Paris, one in Fontaine-Fourches! Thanks for your frequent stops on my blog my friend.
V

JM said...

I like these 'before and after' shots! They look beautiful flowering or dry. We have them a lot here too.

roentarre said...

I love these beautiful native flowers

roentarre said...

I love these beautiful native flowers

Joan Elizabeth said...

I agree they have great character and are very photogenic. I featured thistles in my blog a year or so ago ... as a weed of course :-)

Julie said...

But of course, Madame!!

However, would it be true that thistles are weeds most places, but a flower somewhere? Scotland, maybe?